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Susie Stubbs

Susie Stubbs

Creative Tourist

Susie Stubbs is the editor of creativetourist.com, an online art and travel site based in Manchester. Creative Tourist exists to provide an insider’s guide to the best art and culture in the city, from mainstream galleries to street art, one-off festivals, independent boutiques and all the things that make Manchester such a culturally rich city. Susie is an award-winning blogger, a former Time Out editor and has published seven books on art, travel and history, including the current Where to Go Manchester guidebook.


Latest articles by Susie Stubbs


Manchester Attractions: 3 Great Views You Need to See

Manchester Attractions: 3 Great Views You Need to See

6.4.2014

How long have you lived in the city without stopping to appreciate its best views? Step right this way, for our top three favourite views of the rainy city.


Hello Mr D'Arcy! Visit the Best Country Homes in Manchester (Including That Famous Fountain!)

Hello Mr D'Arcy! Visit the Best Country Homes in Manchester (Including That Famous Fountain!)

5.19.2014

Manchester may be best known for its mills and industry (or shops and football, depending on your persuasion), but it is also remarkably rich in historic houses the most famous probably being Lyme Park. Here are three of our favourites – all within striking distance of Manchester city centre.

Dunham Massey

For 300 years the family home of the aristocratic Grey family (distantly related to that Lady Jane Grey), Dunham Massey is far more than a grand country house. While its interiors meticulously document the sometimes tumultuous lives of the various Earls of Stamford who once called it home – the last earl gave the house to the National Trust in 1976 – Dunham is as well known for its formal gardens, expansive parkland (whose herd of fallow deer can be traced back to Norman times) and winter gardens. These latter gardens feature over 25,000 early flowering bulbs - snowdrops, crocuses, daffodils – whose effusive blooms are a cheery sight during those months when all else is bare. Recent developments include a shiny new visitor centre while the house, meanwhile, has been transformed into the Stamford Hospital. This is a recreation of the military hospital Dunham became during WWI and is a humbling reminder, timed to commemorate its 100th anniversary, of just how much the “war to end all wars” affected lives both ordinary and aristocratic. Free entry to parkland; charges apply to house and gardens (free for National Trust members).


Manchester's Best Museum and Gallery Shops

Manchester's Best Museum and Gallery Shops

4.18.2014

Forget Market Street – sometimes the best and most interesting places to shop are found inside museums and galleries. Here are a few of our Manchester favourites.

MOSI

MOSI, Manchester’s Museum of Science & Industry, does many things well: steam train rides, interactive exhibits and blockbuster shows that somehow manage to combine science, art and discovery in one heady mix. Its on-site shop is stacked with the sort of science-related goodies that make for unusual gifts. After a glow-in-the-dark solar system? Step right this way. How about an instant IQ test, retro train poster or book that explains How Nearly Everything Was Invented? You can get all of these items alongside the usual museum souvenirs, pocket money toys and vintage trinkets – but it’s for the science kits, books and toys that this shop really stands out.


Top Three Art Galleries in Manchester

Top Three Art Galleries in Manchester

4.18.2014

Looking for the best place to see new and historic artworks? Here’s our three favourite galleries – plus mention of one other that has some exciting things planned for 2014.

Manchester Art Gallery

This is the grand dame of Manchester’s art scene, a neo-Classical gallery that sits slap-bang in the middle of the city centre. Its monumental frontage, Grade I-listed and designed by the celebrated Victorian architect, Charles Barry, signals that serious art is contained within. And, indeed, once you step through its Corinthian-columned entrance you’re met with a historic collection that boasts some 25,000 objects, paintings and sculptures, from world-renowned Pre-Raphaelite paintings by the likes of Millais and Rossetti to works by the 17th century Dutch masters. But, while it may have an impressive collection, this is one gallery that’s not all about the old. The building was extended in 2002, with a glass-roofed atrium connecting the Victorian building to newer gallery spaces. Now, alongside historic shows, it stages regular contemporary exhibitions, with work and new commissions from some of the biggest names in visual art. Turner Prize winner Jeremy Deller, for example, premiered his All That Is Solid Melts Into Air here in November 2013, while the Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos opens an exhibition of new, large-scale sculptural work in February 2014 (until June). The gallery also boasts a decent restaurant and café (with great homemade cakes), is open until 8pm every Thursday, offers hands-on activity packs and workshops for kids - and is our top tip for a calm, cultural respite from the city’s busy, traffic-clogged streets.